Monthly Archives: April 2014

Never Again

Candles_0Today is Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah) in Israel. The date was chosen because of it’s position between the Anniversary of the Waraw Ghetto Uprising and Israel Independence Day, and indeed in Hebrew the full name of the day is Yom HaZikaron laShoah ve-laGvura (Holocaust and Heroism Remembrance Day). There is a clear “angle” here, but then different points of view are fine as long as we recognise them as such.  Continue reading

Voo-Jew?

schlissel challasA little-known Chassidic custom has been gaining momentum. For the last few years I’ve been finding two opposing kinds of posts on my Facebook wall just days after the end of Pesach.

Some of them proudly show photographs of a home made challah in the shape of a key (with an accompanying wish to friends for “prosperity”); while others include derisory memes berating the “Christian or pagan” custom of “Schlissel Challah” as yet another “segulah” that cheapens God into a sort of “vending machine for superstitious people”.

So what is it really? Continue reading

Roasted or boiled?

eggIn the early seventies there was a marvelous British TV advert by the Egg Marketing Board. It involved a lodger who comes down for breakfast to a harridan of a landlady who asks him sourly, “How do you want your eggs, fried or boiled?

He drifts off into a fantasy of eggs cooked in all sorts of delicious, exotic ways, asking himself in his mind: “or scrambled?, or poached?, or en cocotte…?” Responding to her from within his fantasy, he says out loud: “Eggs Risotto please, Mrs. Burridge.” She shocks him back to reality with the caustic retort: “Is that fried or boiled?”

My question is a little different. Should the egg on the Seder plate be roasted or boiled? Continue reading

Marror in your back garden!

marror-hagada

(Photo credit: Catriel Ceballos)

Bitter herbs are the last of the three items (Pesach, Matzah, and Marror), without mention of which. the Haggadah tells us, no Seder service is complete. However those of us used to eating crisp and juicy Romaine lettuce might be a little surprised to see the somewhat less luscious relative of this modern cultivar that our ancestors actually ate at their Seder. In fact you may have it growing in your own garden and think of it as a weed! Continue reading